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DNS Configuration for Your Dedicated Server

Posted on : 31-01-2012 | By : admin | In : DNS VPS

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Undertaking the DNS configuration for your dedicated server is an important task and without it, you will not be able to gain access to your site. This is why if you lack the confidence to alter these steps by yourself, seeking the advice or following step by step instructions can make a big difference. There is a real need to have the DNS configuration set up properly on your dedicated server because this is what allows computers to read your domain name as an IP address.

One of the ways to greatly simplify this process is to have a good control panel software at your disposal. When you set up or select your dedicated server, you will find that there is often a choice of control panel software packages to select from. It may not seem like a big deal at the time but making the right decision can help to make life so much easier in the long run.

The first step is to define the name servers for your domain in the control panel. Two are the standard, with ns1 and ns2 being the standard layout for the names. The first process of this step comes with clicking on the DNS button on your main page and then clicking on the edit option (commonly displayed as a pencil on many control panels) beside the domain name you wish to edit. From here, supply the correct details into the proper A and NS records and you will be on your way to configuring your dedicated server.

Following this, the next step is to ensure that your domain name has been registered. Some people decide to register a domain name with their hosting company, which can make life a lot easier. If your domain name is registered with a different firm, you will need to contact that firm to carry out the transferring process.

As long as you take your time and don’t rush into anything, configuring the DNS on your dedicated servers will pose no problem at all.
Retrieved from:http://iblogndax.vdhdesigns.com/dns-configuration-for-your-dedicated-server/

Poisoning DNS perhaps a bad idea

Posted on : 29-01-2012 | By : admin | In : DNS VPS

Tags: ,

0

This is insane. I’m sitting at a café in Sydney using their hotspot. Went to search for something, and I kept getting strange looking “site not found” pages. Huh? Thy were working a few hours ago. So I started digging.

The café’s upstream ISP is “Optus”, one of the major Australian carriers. To my astonishment I found that Optus’s DNS servers are interfering with Google searches, stealing their DNS lookups and serving results pages on their own (shitty quality) branded search instead! Try https:? No connection; and Google+ wouldn’t load either.

Obviously as soon as realized what’s going on I immediately changed DNS servers to something reliable. Before I did I found a tiny “about this page” link at the bottom of the heinous Optus search results page, where I was told how great this was for me, but how I could opt out of their “default” search engine if I wanted to but was warned this was an “advanced setting”.

Seriously, what do Optus think they’re doing? From a commercial standpoint, do they really think that their captive audience matters to anyone advertising on the web? Of course not, but in the mean time they’re certainly going to alienate customers who just maybe actually do want to use (in this case) Google sites.

There’s a bigger issue, though. Unaltered answers to DNS queries is a backbone of net neutrality. That’s our problem, but once carriers start poisoning nameservers in their own favour it will be but a blink before everyone is doing it to each other and lookups will become worthless. While I’m sure the morons in Marketing who thought that sabotaging DNS queries would be a good idea won’t be worried about the wreckage that will cause for everyone else, such a war wouldn’t be good for any of the companies involved, either. And meanwhile, if they really want everyone to learn how to install an app to “fix” the internet…
Retrieved from:http://blogs.operationaldynamics.com/andrew/engineering/internet/poisoning-dns-perhaps-a-bad-idea

How to configure DNS settings on your iOS device? [What, How and Why]

Posted on : 29-01-2012 | By : admin | In : DNS VPS

Tags: ,

0


Configure Google, OpenDNS or any other DNS server on your iOS device to improve the Wireless browsing experience on your iOS device and also check which works better on your device.
If you are one of those who are experiencing some glitches with your WiFi browsing speeds, then you would probably want to looks for the correct DNS server that works well with your iDevice. There are a lot of tools to figure that out, but Namebench is the best among the many tools that are available. The tool is available for the Mac and is completely Open Source.
In this tutorial, we will figure out the fastest possible DNS server for your network, and configure your iDevice appropriately to get to the edge. Before we could get into this thingy, we need to know what a DNS Server is (just the gist of it).
What is a DNS Server?
A DNS stands for Domain Name System. All it does is that, it translates the domain names, which are of the numerical forms into human readable ones. The translations is what it matters when it comes to configuring the DNS servers onto your iDevice. The faster it translates, the better is your browsing experience. If you are interested in knowing more about DNS and how it translates and all those stuffs, Wikipedia has the best and simple explanations for these.
Configuring your device with correct DNS servers will yield better browsing experiences!
How to Configure DNS on your iOS device?
The configuration is pretty simple. And it just needs a few touches to get this up and running. I have attached the screenshots for configuring your device too!

You need to be connected to a WiFi network to proceed with this!

1.From your iDevice’s home screen, go to Settings > WiFi


1.Choose the network for which you want to configure the DNS settings. [You need to be connected to that particular network to configure its DNS]

2.Under the DNS Field, delete the existing DNS, that would be set by default by the router and enter the new DNS server’s address.


3.After typing the DNS Server information, Tap the WiFi Networks button to take you back to the WiFi Settings page!

4.You are now configured to your desired DNS Server.

Recommend some good DNS Servers:
There are two DNS Servers that perform best. The Google‘s and the OpenDNS servers. Google DNS works out for most of them, since they have got some huge data farms and never goes down. Here are the addresses for these DNS Servers:
Google DNS – 8.8.8.8 , 8.8.4.4
OpenDNS – 208.67.222.222, 208.67.220.220
What effect does DNS servers have on my device? And why should I configure it?
Well, as everyone wants to get the max out of technology, you would be expecting to get the full WiFi speeds for the amount you pay for your bandwidth. These custom DNS servers helps resolve the domain names you query from your device faster than normal.

Retrieved from:http://www.karthikk.net/2011/12/how-to-configure-dns-settings-on-your-ios-device-what-how-and-why/

Increase you Internet Speed – Find the best DNS servers based your location

Posted on : 29-01-2012 | By : admin | In : DNS VPS

Tags: ,

0

Is your Internet connection giving the best performance? You might have purchased the best available plan but still not satisfied with the speed. Whichever type of internet connection ( DSL, 3G, ADSL, EDGE, Broadband) you are using, there is always a possibility to tweak it.
Domain Name Server (DNS) is a translator that converts the website name to an IP address. When you click on the hyper-link, or enter an address like www.yahoo.com in your browser, the browser sends the name to DNS servers that help route requests to the proper IP address URL. When you configure the ISP’s Internet connection is set up to use your ISP’s DNS service. However, you are free to use other alternatives. As such, you can use Open DNS or Google Public DNS etc., to replace your ISP’s DNS.
Open DNS offers rich content-filtering options for privacy and security of the family. Google Public DNS has been engineered by Google techies for faster performance and better security. However, because of the complex variables involved, there is no single option can be said to be the best for all. So how do you know the DNS is the fastest for you? you can use the NameBench tool, which is a free tool to help you find the fastest DNS for. NameBench is available for Mac OS X, Windows, and UNIX with GUI as well as command line interface.

NameBench hunts down the fastest DNS servers available for your computer to use. namebench runs a fair and thorough benchmark using your web browser history, tcpdump output, or standardized datasets in order to provide an individualized recommendation. namebench is completely free and does not modify your system in any way.

After scanning is complete NameBench displays a through report with recommended DNS configuration for you system. Before making DNS changes just note down the settings and apply recommendations given by the this free tool. Apply the new settings and enjoy the Increased Speed.
Retrieved from:http://www.thetechhub.com/2011/12/increase-you-internet-speed-find-best.html

DNS Servers and Zones

Posted on : 11-01-2012 | By : admin | In : DNS VPS

Tags: ,

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Primary DNS Servers

A DNS Server contains zone files. If a DNS Server is authoritative over a zone file, it has full control over it. A Primary DNS Server can update, make additions to, modify and delete records in the zone file. The Primary DNS Server is the only place modifications to the domain can be made. Primary DNS Servers are authoritative over the zones that they contain. Multiple Primary DNS Servers can be authoritative for the same zone, any changes to the zone file will be replicated to all other DNS Servers.

Secondary DNS Servers

A Secondary DNS Server contains backup copies of a zone file and can only read information from the zone file. A Secondary DNS Server cannot update or delete records from the zone file it contains. Any changes that need to be made to the zone file have to be made on the Primary DNS Server. These changes are then replicated to the secondary DNS server. Secondary DNS Servers are used for load-balancing and fault-tolerance.

Use the buttons below to navigate through the lesson

Forward Lookup Zones

A Forward lookup is the most common form of DNS lookup. This type of lookup converts a hostname into an IP address. A Forward Lookup-Zone contains Name to IP Address mappings. Each zone file consists of a number of resource records (RR’s). Resource records (RR’s) contain information about certain resources on the network.

Resource Records

There are several types of resource records (RR’s) that can be found in a zone file:

A (Host) Record: Is used to associate a host’s name to an IP address.
CNAME (Alias): An IP Address can have more than one name. Some Web Sites, for example, have several Web Servers for load balancing, each with different IP Addresses. A query to www.microsoft.com will give you several possible IP Addresses all pointing to the same web-site.
MX (Mail Exchanger): A Mail record used to indicate where mail for the domain should go.
The Name Server Record (NS): Shows which DNS Servers are authoritative for this zone.
Start of Authority (SOA) Record: This is the first record in the database file and contains information about the zone file.
Service (SRV) Records. These contain the IP addresses of different services on the domain, e.g. the services used to logon and query Active Directory. Domains could not function without SRV records.
Reverse Lookup Zones

A Reverse Lookup-Zone contains IP Address to Name mappings. This allows the computer to do reverse queries, some applications need to be able to make reverse lookup queries. Reverse Lookup Zones contain the following Resource Records.

Pointer Record: (Does the opposite of the A record it maps an IP address to a host name. By having the two types of records it is possible to do a reverse lookup.)
CNAME (Alias)
The Start of Authority (SOA) record
The Name Server Record (NS)
When doing reverse-lookups, DNS uses the same principle as a forward query. The IP address is reversed allowing queries to start from the least specific to the most specific. The special domain name in_addr.arpa is used for reverse lookups. e.g. A query about the hostname of 10.1.0.1 would result in a query to a zone-file called 0.1.10.in_addr.arpa.

Active Directory Integrated Zones

Active Directory Integrated Zones store the same information as standard Zone Files, however the information is stored and replicated with the Active Directory. There are no Primary or Secondary Zones. All zones are multi-master, which means that you can update any of the zones and the changes will be replicated.

Active Directory zones as well as standard Windows Server 2003 zones use IXFR (Incremental Zone Transfers), which means that when a change is made to a zone file, only that change is replicated instead of the entire database. This can lower network traffic between DNS Servers. Active Directory Zones allow for secure, dynamic updates. Updates to the DNS zone are done automatically and only clients who are a member of the forest can register.

Stub Zones

A stub-zone contains a partial copy of another zone. The zone contains only the NS and SOA records for its master zone. Stub zones identify the servers that are authoritative for the master zone and the servers that are authoritative for its child zones below the master in the namespace.
Stub zones are mainly used to keep track of name servers in delegated child zones when there are a great deal of children.

Root Servers

If your Windows Network isn’t connected to the Internet or if you want to prevent users querying anything on the Internet, you can configure a DNS server to contain its own root zone. The Root Zone is treated as the master of all queries. Nothing is ever queried above a Root Zone. A Root Zone can never be demoted and then a new Root Server placed above it. It is therefore essential that you plan your DNS implementation correctly.

Caching-Only DNS Servers

All DNS Servers store the queries that they have resolved. However caching-only DNS Servers only cache the information and don’t actually hold any sort of zone file. When a caching-only DNS Server is first started it contains no information and the cache is gradually built up over time using iterative queries to other DNS Servers that contain the information. A caching-only server is not authoritative for any zone.

Caching only servers can be used to speed up Internet access on networks. The DNS server will store any queries it makes to the Internet and speed up name resolution.

A DNS Server can be configured to forward name resolution requests to other DNS Servers. These forwarding requests can either be all unresolvable queries or queries based on domain-names (conditional).
Retrieved from:http://www.free-online-training-courses.com/dns-servers-and-zones/

Public DNS Server Tool for Windows

Posted on : 11-01-2012 | By : admin | In : DNS VPS

Tags: ,

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DNS servers play an essential role on today’s Internet. They translate domain names into IP addresses. Without them, users would have to enter IP addresses directly to access sites on the Internet. Most Internet users are using their Internet Service Provider’s DNS server. While that is often a convenient solution, it can have consequences.

Some ISP’s highjack domain queries with typos to earn additional revenue from the user. Others might block website access with the help of the DNS system.

Public DNS servers can be an alternative. Common ones are Open DNS, Google DNS or Norton DNS among others.

They often offer features that the ISP dns servers are not offering. This may including blocking of advertisement or tracking related scripts, or parental controls to protect minors from Internet threats.

Experienced computer users should not have issues changing DNS servers on their computer. Inexperienced users on the other hand might prefer to use a tool that automates the process.

Public DNS Server Tool is a free portable program for Windows that can change the DNS server of installed network cards. It is similar to DNS Jumper which can also be used for the purpose.

It takes two clicks after program start to change the DNS server. You need to select a network card first if multiple cards are installed on the system. You can ignore the network interface card pulldown menu otherwise.

A click on the public dns servers menu displays the list of supported services. This includes Google DNS, Open DNS, Norton DNS, Comodo Secure, ScrubIt DNS and DNS Advantage. Just select one of the providers from the list and click on change afterwards to use the new DNS server from that moment on on the system.

You can alternatively change the IPs directly in the current DNS servers listing.

The program is not displaying information about the providers, which may make it necessary to do some digging of your own. You may also like to use the DNS Server benchmark tool to test the connection speed.

Windows users can download the Public DNS Server Tool from the developer website. The program is compatible with 32-bit and 64-bit editions of the operating system.

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Retrieved from:http://www.ghacks.net/2011/12/26/public-dns-server-tool-for-windows/

Poisoning DNS perhaps a bad idea

Posted on : 03-01-2012 | By : admin | In : DNS VPS

Tags: ,

0

This is insane. I’m sitting at a café in Sydney using their hotspot. Went to search for something, and I kept getting strange looking “site not found” pages. Huh? Thy were working a few hours ago. So I started digging.

The café’s upstream ISP is “Optus”, one of the major Australian carriers. To my astonishment I found that Optus’s DNS servers are interfering with Google searches, stealing their DNS lookups and serving results pages on their own (shitty quality) branded search instead! Try https:? No connection; and Google+ wouldn’t load either.

Obviously as soon as realized what’s going on I immediately changed DNS servers to something reliable. Before I did I found a tiny “about this page” link at the bottom of the heinous Optus search results page, where I was told how great this was for me, but how I could opt out of their “default” search engine if I wanted to but was warned this was an “advanced setting”.

Seriously, what do Optus think they’re doing? From a commercial standpoint, do they really think that their captive audience matters to anyone advertising on the web? Of course not, but in the mean time they’re certainly going to alienate customers who just maybe actually do want to use (in this case) Google sites.

There’s a bigger issue, though. Unaltered answers to DNS queries is a backbone of net neutrality. That’s our problem, but once carriers start poisoning nameservers in their own favour it will be but a blink before everyone is doing it to each other and lookups will become worthless. While I’m sure the morons in Marketing who thought that sabotaging DNS queries would be a good idea won’t be worried about the wreckage that will cause for everyone else, such a war wouldn’t be good for any of the companies involved, either. And meanwhile, if they really want everyone to learn how to install an app to “fix” the internet…

Of course, this is only a taste of what we’ll be in for when the communications minister finally gets his compulsory Great Firewall of Australia censorship in place, but one thing at a time. If you’re looking for internet access down here, clearly Optus or anything that uses their network should be blacklisted.
Retrieved from:http://blogs.operationaldynamics.com/andrew/engineering/internet/poisoning-dns-perhaps-a-bad-idea

How to configure DNS settings on your iOS device? [What, How and Why]

Posted on : 03-01-2012 | By : admin | In : DNS VPS

Tags: ,

0

Configure Google, OpenDNS or any other DNS server on your iOS device to improve the Wireless browsing experience on your iOS device and also check which works better on your device.
If you are one of those who are experiencing some glitches with your WiFi browsing speeds, then you would probably want to looks for the correct DNS server that works well with your iDevice. There are a lot of tools to figure that out, but Namebench is the best among the many tools that are available. The tool is available for the Mac and is completely Open Source.
In this tutorial, we will figure out the fastest possible DNS server for your network, and configure your iDevice appropriately to get to the edge. Before we could get into this thingy, we need to know what a DNS Server is (just the gist of it)
What is a DNS Server?
A DNS stands for Domain Name System. All it does is that, it translates the domain names, which are of the numerical forms into human readable ones. The translations is what it matters when it comes to configuring the DNS servers onto your iDevice. The faster it translates, the better is your browsing experience. If you are interested in knowing more about DNS and how it translates and all those stuffs, Wikipedia has the best and simple explanations for these.
Configuring your device with correct DNS servers will yield better browsing experiences!
How to Configure DNS on your iOS device?
The configuration is pretty simple. And it just needs a few touches to get this up and running. I have attached the screenshots for configuring your device too!
You need to be connected to a WiFi network to proceed with this!
From your iDevice’s home screen, go to Settings > WiFi


Choose the network for which you want to configure the DNS settings. [You need to be connected to that particular network to configure its DNS]


2.Under the DNS Field, delete the existing DNS, that would be set by default by the router and enter the new DNS server’s address.

After typing the DNS Server information, Tap the WiFi Networks button to take you back to the WiFi Settings page!
You are now configured to your desired DNS Server.
Recommend some good DNS Servers:

There are two DNS Servers that perform best. The Google‘s and the OpenDNS servers. Google DNS works out for most of them, since they have got some huge data farms and never goes down. Here are the addresses for these DNS Servers:

Google DNS – 8.8.8.8 , 8.8.4.4
OpenDNS – 208.67.222.222, 208.67.220.220
What effect does DNS servers have on my device? And why should I configure it?

Well, as everyone wants to get the max out of technology, you would be expecting to get the full WiFi speeds for the amount you pay for your bandwidth. These custom DNS servers helps resolve the domain names you query from your device faster than normal.

Retrieved from:http://www.karthikk.net/2011/12/how-to-configure-dns-settings-on-your-ios-device-what-how-and-why/

Increase you Internet Speed – Find the best DNS servers based your location

Posted on : 03-01-2012 | By : admin | In : DNS VPS

Tags: ,

0

Is your Internet connection giving the best performance? You might have purchased the best available plan but still not satisfied with the speed. Whichever type of internet connection ( DSL, 3G, ADSL, EDGE, Broadband) you are using, there is always a possibility to tweak it.
Domain Name Server (DNS) is a translator that converts the website name to an IP address. When you click on the hyper-link, or enter an address like www.yahoo.com in your browser, the browser sends the name to DNS servers that help route requests to the proper IP address URL. When you configure the ISP’s Internet connection is set up to use your ISP’s DNS service. However, you are free to use other alternatives. As such, you can use Open DNS or Google Public DNS etc., to replace your ISP’s DNS.
Open DNS offers rich content-filtering options for privacy and security of the family. Google Public DNS has been engineered by Google techies for faster performance and better security. However, because of the complex variables involved, there is no single option can be said to be the best for all. So how do you know the DNS is the fastest for you? you can use the NameBench tool, which is a free tool to help you find the fastest DNS for. NameBench is available for Mac OS X, Windows, and UNIX with GUI as well as command line interface.

NameBench hunts down the fastest DNS servers available for your computer to use. namebench runs a fair and thorough benchmark using your web browser history, tcpdump output, or standardized datasets in order to provide an individualized recommendation. namebench is completely free and does not modify your system in any way.

After scanning is complete NameBench displays a through report with recommended DNS configuration for you system. Before making DNS changes just note down the settings and apply recommendations given by the this free tool. Apply the new settings and enjoy the Increased Speed.
Retrieved from:http://www.thetechhub.com/2011/12/increase-you-internet-speed-find-best.html

How To Change The DNS Servers Of A Domain Name

Posted on : 04-12-2011 | By : admin | In : DNS Hosting, DNS VPS

Tags: ,

0

Buying a domain name is not enough to have a website up and running. You need to host your site on a server. In order for this to work, you have to point the DNS servers of your domain name to the values indicated by your webhosting company.

I’m giving you this example: I bought a domain name from Namecheap and a hosting account from Bluehost. When I bought the domain name, I didn’t know where I was going to host my site yet, so I didn’t enter any DNS servers. Now that I decided to put it on Bluehost, I need to make the DNS names ns1.bluehost.com and ns2.bluehost.com, as indicated in my Bluehost account. It doesn’t matter where you get your webhosting from. All companies will provide you the DNS servers you need to point your domain name at. Make note of these values, then go to the registrar where you bought your domain from and replace whatever default values with your new ones. I’ll show you how to do it in NameCheap, GoDaddy and Moniker. If you need help with another registrar, just leave a comment here and I’ll add a short tutorial for you.

How to change DNS servers in NameCheap
After you enter your NameCheap login data, go to DOMAINS and choose Manage Domains from the drop-down menu.

In the next screen, click on your domain name. Then, from the left side menu, choose “Transfer DNS to webhost”. Type the new DNS servers in the first two fields in the form, as you can see in the picture below:

Click on “Save changes” at the bottom of the form and you’re done. Keep in mind that it may take up to 24 hours until the changes become effective, so you can take a break until tomorrow, when we are going to see how to install WordPress using Simple Scripts or Fantastico.

How to change DNS servers in GoDaddy
Finding and changing the DNS servers in GoDaddy would be easy if they didn’t have such a busy page design. It’s like they want to upsell you everything they have. Anyway, you first need to go to Domain Manager, which is easy to find. Just click on MyAccount (the last item in the main menu) and you’ll then see “My Domains with a link that says “See all in Domain Manager”. If you click on that, you’ll see a login form and right after you login you’ll be in your Domain Manager. From there, choose the domain name you want to change DNS servers for.

After you choose your domain name, click on it, then click on Set nameservers, as you can see from the picture above. After you make sure you have selected the “I have specific nameservers for my domains” radio button, enter your desired values for Nameserver 1 and Nameserver 2. For Bluehost, they will be ns1.bluehost.com and ns2.bluehost.com:

Click OK and you’re done. Don’t forget that it takes hours for the changes to become active. This is valid for any other registrar and any other webhost. It’s how the internet works.

How to change DNS servers in Moniker

Next you have to click on your domain name to enter the DNS editing mode:

All you need to do now is enter your new nameservers and your site will be ready to go:

Now you are ready for installing WordPress on your site. I’ll show you how to do it in one of the next lessons.

Resources used in this lesson:
Bluehost shared hosting account: $5.95 per month
.com domain name registered with NameCheap: $9.98 per year
.com domain name registered with GoDaddy: $9.99 per year
.com domain name registered with Moniker: $8.99 per year
Seeing that you only need to buy one domain name from any of the registrars, your costs for operating a website are about $80 per year. This is the minimum needed you have to pay for. Everything else can be found online for free if your budget doesn’t allow any extras.

Retrieved from:http://www.alltipsandtricks.com/how-to-change-dns-servers-domain-name/